She shuddered to believe, yet could not help believing, that it gave her a sympathetic knowledge of the hidden sin in other hearts.
Drink it! It may be less soothing than a sinless conscience. That I cannot give thee. But it will calm the swell and heaving of thy passion, like oil thrown on the waves of a temptestuous sea.
—Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letterpg. 68

Drink it! It may be less soothing than a sinless conscience. That I cannot give thee. But it will calm the swell and heaving of thy passion, like oil thrown on the waves of a temptestuous sea.

—Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
pg. 68

Thus she will be a living sermon against sin,  until the ignominious letter be engraved up on her tombstone.—Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letterpg. 59

Thus she will be a living sermon against sin, until the ignominious letter be engraved up on her tombstone.

—Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
pg. 59

A blessing on the righteous Colony of the Massachusetts, where iniquity is dragged out into the sunshine!
—Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letterpg. 52

A blessing on the righteous Colony of the Massachusetts, where iniquity is dragged out into the sunshine!

—Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter
pg. 52

Ah, but," interposed, more softly, a young wife, holding a child by the hand, "let her cover the mark as she will, the pang of it will always be in her heart.
We might have been idiots ourselves—everybody might have been born idiots, instead of having their right senses.
—George Eliot, Brother Jacobpg. 82

We might have been idiots ourselves—everybody might have been born idiots, instead of having their right senses.

—George Eliot, Brother Jacob
pg. 82

Since, as we know, men change their skies and see new constellations without changing their souls, it will follow sometimes that they don’t change their business under those novel circumstances.
—George Eliot, Brother Jacobpg. 76

Since, as we know, men change their skies and see new constellations without changing their souls, it will follow sometimes that they don’t change their business under those novel circumstances.

—George Eliot, Brother Jacob
pg. 76